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Showing: 1-10 results of 1168

First published in 1624, Edward Winslow's Good News from New England chronicles the early experience of the Plimoth colonists, or Pilgrims, in the New World. For several years Winslow acted as the Pilgrims' primary negotiator with New England Algonquians, including the Wampanoag, Massachusett, and Narragansett Indians. During this period he was credited with having cured the Wampanoag sachem Massasoit, one of the colonists' most valuable allies, of an... more...

As a child growing up in rural Oklahoma, Donald Fixico often heard “hvmakimata”—“that’s what they used to say”—a phrase Mvskoke Creeks and Seminoles use to end stories. In his latest work, Fixico, who is Shawnee, Sac and Fox, Mvskoke Creek, and Seminole, invites readers into his own oral tradition to learn how storytelling, legends and prophecies, and oral histories and creation myths knit together to explain the Indian... more...

A descendant of The American Indian Experience, this compelling anthology showcases the work of sixteen specialists. Those chapters retained from the original volume have been carefully revised to make them more accessible to the average undergraduate, while six entirely new and original essays consider important topics: American Indian women; Indian-Spanish relations in the Greater Southwest in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries; Indian affairs... more...

In 1990, the Glenbow Museum took its first tentative steps toward repatriation by returning sacred objects to First Nations' peoples. These efforts drew harsh criticism from members of the provincial government. Was it not the museum's primary legal, ethical, and fiduciary responsibility to ensure the physical preservation of its collections? Undaunted by such criticism, more than fifty medicine bundles were returned to Blackfoot and Cree communities... more...

In addition to revisions and updates, the second edition of “We Are Still Here” features new material, seeing this well-loved American History Series volume maintain its treatment of American Indians in the 20th century while extending its coverage into the opening decades of the 21st century. Provides student and general readers concise and engaging coverage of contemporary history of American Indians contributed by top... more...


[Read by Armando Duran] In 1877, Chief Standing Bear's Ponca Indian tribe was forcibly removed from their Nebraska homeland and marched to Oklahoma -- known then as Indian Territory -- in what became the tribe's own Trail of Tears. ''I Am a Man'' chronicles what happened when Standing Bear set off on a six-hundred-mile walk to return the body of his only son to their traditional burial grounds. Along the way, it examines the complex relationship... more...

In 1868 American explorer Charles Francis Hall interviewed several Inuit hunters who spoke of strangers travelling through their land. Hall immediately jumped to the conclusion that the hunters were talking about survivors of the Franklin expedition and set off for the Melville Peninsula, the location of many of the sightings, to collect further stories and evidence to support his supposition. His theory, however, was roundly dismissed... more...